Our Medical Services

A gynecologist treats patients with female reproductive organs, whether or not they identify as women. An obstetrician is a kind of gynecologist who specializes in pregnancy and childbirth.

To become a gynecologist, a person must train first as a doctor for 4 years, then specialize for another 4 years in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. Passing a further examination will enable them to be certified and registered.

Primary Services

General Gynaecology

General gynaecology includes advice and management of a vast array of female related ailments.

This may start early like problems with new born girls, puberty, sexual dilemmas and menopausal problems. During puberty acne and hirsutism (excessive hair growth) is also part and parcel of our domain of work.

The reasons for menstrual irregularity may range from hormonal defects, to weight problems but may include more serious abnormalities like growths and cancer.

General gynaecological examinations include palpation of your breasts, thyroid examination, abdominal abnormalities, local genital exam, pap smears and evaluation of the pelvic organs, bimanually and by ultrasound, often done vaginally.

Gynaecolgocal Oncology

Need info? General gynaecology includes advice and management of a vast array of female related ailments.

This may start early like problems with new born girls, puberty, sexual dilemmas and menopausal problems. During puberty acne and hirsutism (excessive hair growth) is also part and parcel of our domain of work.

The reasons for menstrual irregularity may range from hormonal defects, to weight problems but may include more serious abnormalities like growths and cancer.

General gynaecological examinations include palpation of your breasts, thyroid examination, abdominal abnormalities, local genital exam, pap smears and evaluation of the pelvic organs, bimanually and by ultrasound, often done vaginally.

Obsterics

The information leaflet will provide you with good information as to what to expect when you are expecting!

Generally you must expect to have a thorough history taken from and an examination done with your first visit, including a pap smear. An array of blood tests will be done to detect risk factors to the pregnancy. An ultrasound will be done to determine your expected date of delivery, how many babies you are carrying and other risk factors.

The 11-13 weeks visit is important to evaluate early development of the foetus and to determine the risk for abnormalities like Down’s syndrome.

The 22 weeks visit is important as a full anatomy scan of the baby is done. About 4% of babies are born with congenital abnormalities and this ultrasound is important to endeavour to diagnose any detectable defects. No guarantee can be given that your baby is absolutely without defects.

From 28 weeks pregnancy duration your baby is viable and the wellbeing and growth of your baby is the main focus point during these visits. Certain maternal diseases like pre- eclampsia and diabetes tend to become detectable at this stage as well.

For ladies planning to have normal vaginal birth, the 34 weeks visit usually includes a vaginal exam to evaluate the size of her pelvis. This is not exact science but it gives your obstetrician an idea what to expect during birth.

Different modes of pain relieve, like epidural anaesthetic, during labour will also be discussed.

Ultrasound becomes inaccurate to determine your baby’s size after 34 weeks and mostly the tape measure is just as accurate and the electronic monitor is primarily used to evaluate foetal wellbeing.

From 36 weeks onwards vaginal examinations are done for those planning normal birth, to determine ripeness of the cervix and progress of changes predicting labour.

For those planning a caesarean section, the bed booking and pre- authorization will be done at this stage. Generally a caesarean section is done 7-10 days before the expected date of full term. As a rule, a spinal anaesthetic is done during c/section, but it may be necessary to revert to a general anaesthetic if the spinal is not working satisfactory.

As mentioned in our section on agreements, we experience a very low rate of complications during c/sections, but all over the world complications do happen. These are mostly mild like wound infections or haematomas. More serious events like severe post-partum haemorrhage, deep venous thrombo- embolism, bladder or bowl injury or pneumonia may happen. Obesity, HIV and AIDS, hypertension, diabetes and poor health do increase the complication rate after surgery or vaginal delivery.

Breast milk is without a doubt the best food for your baby and the nursing staff is geared to assist with the very important task of breast feeding. The adaptation to breast feeding is more difficult than anticipated for most first mothers! Time, patients and grid id often needed to accomplish success. On the other hand is it true that some women can’t or don’t want to breast feed and this is always respected.

The vision of this practice is to send a happy healthy mother home with a normal healthy baby in her arms.

Infertility

The information leaflet will provide you with good information as to what to expect when you are expecting!

Generally you must expect to have a thorough history taken from and an examination done with your first visit, including a pap smear. An array of blood tests will be done to detect risk factors to the pregnancy. An ultrasound will be done to determine your expected date of delivery, how many babies you are carrying and other risk factors.

The 11-13 weeks visit is important to evaluate early development of the foetus and to determine the risk for abnormalities like Down’s syndrome.

The 22 weeks visit is important as a full anatomy scan of the baby is done. About 4% of babies are born with congenital abnormalities and this ultrasound is important to endeavour to diagnose any detectable defects. No guarantee can be given that your baby is absolutely without defects.

From 28 weeks pregnancy duration your baby is viable and the wellbeing and growth of your baby is the main focus point during these visits. Certain maternal diseases like pre- eclampsia and diabetes tend to become detectable at this stage as well.

For ladies planning to have normal vaginal birth, the 34 weeks visit usually includes a vaginal exam to evaluate the size of her pelvis. This is not exact science but it gives your obstetrician an idea what to expect during birth.

Different modes of pain relieve, like epidural anaesthetic, during labour will also be discussed.

Ultrasound becomes inaccurate to determine your baby’s size after 34 weeks and mostly the tape measure is just as accurate and the electronic monitor is primarily used to evaluate foetal wellbeing.

From 36 weeks onwards vaginal examinations are done for those planning normal birth, to determine ripeness of the cervix and progress of changes predicting labour.

For those planning a caesarean section, the bed booking and pre- authorization will be done at this stage. Generally a caesarean section is done 7-10 days before the expected date of full term. As a rule, a spinal anaesthetic is done during c/section, but it may be necessary to revert to a general anaesthetic if the spinal is not working satisfactory.

As mentioned in our section on agreements, we experience a very low rate of complications during c/sections, but all over the world complications do happen. These are mostly mild like wound infections or haematomas. More serious events like severe post-partum haemorrhage, deep venous thrombo- embolism, bladder or bowl injury or pneumonia may happen. Obesity, HIV and AIDS, hypertension, diabetes and poor health do increase the complication rate after surgery or vaginal delivery.

Breast milk is without a doubt the best food for your baby and the nursing staff is geared to assist with the very important task of breast feeding. The adaptation to breast feeding is more difficult than anticipated for most first mothers! Time, patients and grid id often needed to accomplish success. On the other hand is it true that some women can’t or don’t want to breast feed and this is always respected.

The vision of this practice is to send a happy healthy mother home with a normal healthy baby in her arms.

Urogynaecology

Urogynaecology involves bladder problems in women but also includes pelvic floor abnormalities. When women ages, their pelvic support ligaments becomes weaker and they develop sagging of the uterus, bladder, colon or small bowl through the vaginal outlet. (prolapse).

During such prolapse a women may experience stress incontinence of urine, feel a bulge in the vagina or become aware of something protruding through the vagina.

This is a gynaecologist’s work to repair and, in this practice, we like to see is as our forte to repair.

Pelvic floor surgery is mostly done through the vagina but under certain circumstances we shall operate through the abdomen. The principle of vaginal surgery is to normalize the defect by using the patient’s own tissue to build a new support for the prolapsing structure. This may lead to slight narrowing of the vagina, often with improved sexual sensation, but sometimes the vagina may end up slightly too narrow for easy penetration. To prevent this, and to prevent prolapse in the distant future, we may revert to a mesh. This is a woven net that is fixed to ligaments in the pelvis. It does improve long term relapse of prolapse but has the disadvantage of eroding the vaginal skin and then may lead to bothersome discharges.

For the management of stress incontinence of urine we mostly use a very small mesh sling with excellent long term results, minimum pain and a short recovery time.

Endocrinology

The menstrual cycle is controlled by a very complicated interaction between different hormones.

The director of the hormonal orchestra is the hypothalamus that directs the pituitary gland, through Gonadotropin Releasing hormone, to release LH and FSH in a synchronised manner. This in turn controls the ovaries to secrete Oestrogen, mainly from the follicles, for the follicles to grow and eventually release an oocyte during ovulation, mostly on day 14 of the female menstrual cycle. After ovulation, progestogen is released to prepare the uterus for conception.

These hormones are influenced by many other hormones like prolactin, (released by the pituitary gland), thyroid hormone, testosterone, cortisone (from the adrenal glands) and insulin (released from the pancreas)

It is important to note that peripheral action of fat cells, muscle etc. influences female hormonal equilibrium.

The most common female hormonal imbalance is caused by the so called poly cystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). This condition is characterised by irregular periods, increased hair growth, infertility and often obesity.

Another common hormonal abnormality is during the menopause.

Women mostly reach the end of their reproductive years after 50 years of age but it can be substantially earlier in some. The symptoms are cessation of menstruations, hot flushes, sleep disturbances, dryness of the vagina and loss of libido. In the long run it leads to loss of bone and change of body habitus.

Hormonal replacement therapy is a controversial topic and has to discussed in detail with your gynaecologist. Many misconceptions are prevalent with this topic and many over the counter medicines are being given without prove of safety or efficacy.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound is the diagnostic modality where electrical impulses are put through a pizo-electrical crystal and sound waves are generated and this is then used to compile a picture.

Without doubt, one of the most important landmarks of prenatal obstetrics is ultrasound diagnostics. The farther of obstetrical and gynaecological ultrasound was Ian Donald and he and Brown published the first scans of a foetus in 1958.

In our practice we use abdominal probes, vaginal probes and so called 3D or 4D probes to assist with diagnosis and evaluation of your pregnancy, the pelvis, or kidneys.

It is a costly examination, as the machines are highly electronic and expensive.

Most medical aids limit us to 2 scans per pregnancy, but patients expect to have a scan during every visit! Often we do scan for free but be aware that you are making use of expensive equipment and more time from the doctor.

The advice from the International Association of Ultrasound in Gynaecology and Obstetrics is that no recordings of scans should be made, and we adhere to these guidelines.

Ultrasound is a very fast progressing modality and with every new machine more detail can be seen. Patients should realize, though, that all abnormalities of babies or the pelvic anatomy cannot be seen. We do our best to follow guidelines put down by the South African Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in this regard.

Contraception

Need info?Ultrasound is the diagnostic modality where electrical impulses are put through a pizo-electrical crystal and sound waves are generated and this is then used to compile a picture.

Without doubt, one of the most important landmarks of prenatal obstetrics is ultrasound diagnostics. The farther of obstetrical and gynaecological ultrasound was Ian Donald and he and Brown published the first scans of a foetus in 1958.

In our practice we use abdominal probes, vaginal probes and so called 3D or 4D probes to assist with diagnosis and evaluation of your pregnancy, the pelvis, or kidneys.

It is a costly examination, as the machines are highly electronic and expensive.

Most medical aids limit us to 2 scans per pregnancy, but patients expect to have a scan during every visit! Often we do scan for free but be aware that you are making use of expensive equipment and more time from the doctor.

The advice from the International Association of Ultrasound in Gynaecology and Obstetrics is that no recordings of scans should be made, and we adhere to these guidelines.

Ultrasound is a very fast progressing modality and with every new machine more detail can be seen. Patients should realize, though, that all abnormalities of babies or the pelvic anatomy cannot be seen. We do our best to follow guidelines put down by the South African Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in this regard.

Gynaecological Surgery

Need info?

Without doubt, one of the most important landmarks of prenatal obstetrics is ultrasound diagnostics. The farther of obstetrical and gynaecological ultrasound was Ian Donald and he and Brown published the first scans of a foetus in 1958.

In our practice we use abdominal probes, vaginal probes and so called 3D or 4D probes to assist with diagnosis and evaluation of your pregnancy, the pelvis, or kidneys.

It is a costly examination, as the machines are highly electronic and expensive.

Most medical aids limit us to 2 scans per pregnancy, but patients expect to have a scan during every visit! Often we do scan for free but be aware that you are making use of expensive equipment and more time from the doctor.

The advice from the International Association of Ultrasound in Gynaecology and Obstetrics is that no recordings of scans should be made, and we adhere to these guidelines.

Ultrasound is a very fast progressing modality and with every new machine more detail can be seen. Patients should realize, though, that all abnormalities of babies or the pelvic anatomy cannot be seen. We do our best to follow guidelines put down by the South African Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in this regard.